Breakouts from vigorous lava channel destroy 3 more homes - KSLA News 12 Shreveport, Louisiana News Weather & Sports

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Breakouts from vigorous lava channel destroy 3 more homes

Aerial view of fissure 8. Photo uploaded July 8, 2018. (Image: USGS) Aerial view of fissure 8. Photo uploaded July 8, 2018. (Image: USGS)
It's been 8 weeks since eruptions started on the Big Island and they show no signs of stopping. (Image: USGS) It's been 8 weeks since eruptions started on the Big Island and they show no signs of stopping. (Image: USGS)
USGS scientists continue to monitor vigorous eruptions on the Big Island. (Image: USGS) USGS scientists continue to monitor vigorous eruptions on the Big Island. (Image: USGS)
A channelized flow of lava continues to pour into the sea. (Image: USGS) A channelized flow of lava continues to pour into the sea. (Image: USGS)
Just a few structures can be seen still standing in this aerial view of Kapoho. (Image: USGS) Just a few structures can be seen still standing in this aerial view of Kapoho. (Image: USGS)
PAHOA, HAWAII (HawaiiNewsNow) -

Lava breakouts from a vigorous channel that's flowing to the sea have destroyed three more homes in Leilani Estates, Hawaii County Civil Defense officials said Wednesday.

Two of the destroyed homes were on Luana Street, and a third was on Nohea Street.

"Be aware that spillovers of the channel and other breakouts are possible on the active flow field," a Civil Defense bulletin said.

The last official tally for the number of homes destroyed in lower Puna was 700, a figure that's continuing to rise.

Meanwhile, hundreds of other homes have sustained damage, are unlivable because of volcanic emissions or are inaccessible.

And thousands remain displaced, stuck in a months-long cycle of explosive events at Halemaumau Crater, ash rising, air pollution and an ongoing flow of  lava into the ocean.

Hawaiian Volcano Observatory geologists said fissure no. 8 continues to pour lava into a channel feeding into the ocean.

At Kilauea's summit crater, explosive eruptions continue to trigger large quakes.

Meanwhile, the eruptions that started May 3 show no signs of stopping.

U.S. Geological Survey scientists say lava now covers more than 6,100 acres on the Big Island. Lava flowing off Kapoho has created at least 405 acres of new land.

Last week along, 46 more homes were destroyed and just four homes remained standing in Kapoho.

As eruptions continue, residents who have lost their homes — or who can't return to them because of toxic gases, or lava cutting across access points — are scrambling for housing solutions. So far, those solutions have been hard to find.

Nonprofits and the community have banded together to provide temporary solutions, including a village of tiny homes in Pahoa. Meanwhile, hundreds remain at Red Cross emergency shelters, camped out in parks, or on private farms.

Fissures 8 and 22 are the only two fissures that remain active, with both flows oozing into Leilani Estates and feeding flows headed to the sea.

Not only that, but the eruption has been so vigorous that it has been creating its own weather over lower Puna with thunderstorms firing up. 

The bigger picture on Hawaii Island remains the same: The eruption is ongoing and it's not clear when it will end.

Hawaii County Mayor Harry Kim on Monday declared a state of emergency for at least the next 60 days and signed a third supplementary emergency proclamation that expands an earlier supplementary emergency proclamation related to real property tax assessments for areas of lower Puna. 

According to Kim, homeowners who are able to relocate from the affected area have not been able to have their homeowner’s exemption relocate with them for at least six months, which has placed an unnecessary hardship on them.

To relieve that, Kim has suspended the period for claiming and applying for a homeowner exemption for anyone who has relocated from the affected area.

This story will be updated. 

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